Back to Top

Tag Archives: Small Bone Innovations

Biomechanical Comparison of Proximal Radius Locking Plates Under Dynamic Loading

Proximal radius fractures are commonly encountered in general orthopaedic and upper extremity subspecialty practices. The surgical treatment of these fractures includes the anatomical reconstruction and stable fixation of the proximal radius to achieve early recovery of elbow function, reducing the complication rate. These goals are often obtained in cases showing no or minimal comminution. However, due to high complication rates in the management of complex and highly comminuted fractures, locked plating systems are being utilized with increasing frequency. Specifically, 20% of all elbow trauma is associated with radial head/neck fractures, which historically has been treated with excision or prosthetic replacement. Further, recent literature advocates radial head preservation whenever possible in young, active patients. This study compares the biomechanical properties of two proximal radius locking plate designs under dynamic loading to determine their ability to withstand the forces which occur during fracture healing and early postoperative rehabilitation.

View PDF

Return to Library

Evaluation of a Mobile Bearing Total Ankle Replacement in Simulation and Clinical Retrieval

The use of total ankle replacements is increasing as an alternative to arthrodesis that allows patients to maintain both mobility and function concomitant with pain relief. Their success, however, remains mixed mostly attributed to the interaction of design geometries and the complexity of ankle joint motion. This has been exemplified by failures of designs with excessive constraint or insufficient material durability leading to loosening and wear. The expectation of these failures makes paramount the evaluation of anticipated device performance, particularly long-term fatigue and wear characteristics, prior to widespread clinical use. The recent United States Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) clearance of the first mobile bearing total ankle replacement represents the culmination of extensive pre-clinical and clinical evaluations. This handout describes the wear characteristics of a three-part mobile total ankle replacement during 10 to 20 years of simulated walking in a novel, multi-axial gait simulator with comparison to clinical retrievals. These results are useful in demonstrating safety and effectiveness of this device and also present a pre-clinical evaluation methodology for future ankle designs.

View PDF

Return to Library

Posted in Ankle| Tagged |

Biomechanical Properties of Fixed-Angle Volar Distal Radius Plates Under Dynamic Loading

Distal radius fractures are commonly encountered in general orthopaedic and hand subspecialty practices. Most surgeons are comfortable with both operative and nonoperative management of these fractures. Treatment options have evolved with fracture pattern governing the specific treatment modality. Casting with or without reduction, percutaneous pinning, external fixation, and open reduction with internal fixation employing dorsal, volar and fragment specific plates are all common methods used to treat these injuries. A paradigm shift has occurred in the treatment of dorsally displaced distal radius fractures. Previous volar plating techniques demonstrated a high failure rate when compared to distal buttress plating which prevented fracture settling and recurrent displacement. Orbay and others have developed volar plating constructs, which provide subchondral support to the distal radius, transferring radiocarpal forces experienced in the postoperative period to the plate and volar cortex. Previous studies have examined biomechanical differences between dorsal and volar plating while further investigations between specific volar plate constructs under static and dynamic loading conditions have been reported. This study compares the biomechanical properties of eight different fixed-angle volar distal radius plate designs under dynamic loading to determine their ability to withstand the forces which occur during fracture healing and early postoperative rehabilitation.

View PDF

Return to Library